Century America Reflection Paper Due May 2nd

The Century America COPLAC project has provided me with a better appreciation of digital history. Previously, I had regarded digitalization as an easy skill. Grandparents and even elementary age children are able to create Facebook profiles and Word Press Blogs with apparent ease. However, I was unaware of the complicated processes associated with website design and writing. As a history major, I felt unprepared to create HTML and CSS coding for vital components of the digital project. I invested many hours searching through coding books to obtain the correct locations of periods and quotations marks so essential to web design. These unexpected difficulties created obstacles toward the completion of our project contract. My partner and I adjusted our goals to reflect these challenges. However, confronting these difficulties I became a better historian. I learned how to conduct community research and efficiently organize my time. More importantly, I gained an understanding of the skills required to present history to wider audience.

Community research was essential to our project’s success. Through interviews and meetings, my partner and I were able to discovery important sources which altered the course of our research. My project partner, Laura Galbraith, and I first encountered John W. Zimmerman and Kim Ward as they were completing the Call Field Aviation Base mural at the Wichita Falls Municipal Airport. Zimmerman and Ward provided insight on important subjects and gave us contact information regarding how to obtain research. Such information included the contact details of Lita Watson who is the head archivist of the Wichita County Archives. Ward used photographs from the Wichita County Archives to reconstruct the base’s layout which was essential to her mural’s perspective. Laura and I were able to use Ward’s outline to gain a better impression of the base which helped in our own search of Call Field photographs. Ms. Watson of the county archives also contributed toward our search by allowing me to explore unhindered through the vast archive. Often, I would invest my Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday afternoons examining records and inquiring with archivists about additional sources of research. Such discussion reviled that the complete collection of the Wichita Daily Times was located at the Wichita Falls Public Library. The Wichita Daily Times was the daily news publication of Wichita Falls during The Great War. This source was essential toward interpreting our project’s topics such as Call Field, The Spanish Flu, the Oil Boom, and the Women’s war contributions. Through an online Facebook Group dedicated to Wichita Falls history, I encountered city cartographer, Paul Bata who reconstructed a map of the Call Field Base. He used old photographs, property records, and satellite imagery to overlay the 1918 aviation field map on the current topography. Bata’s unique map connects Wichita Falls to the past. Although this research was vital to our project, the methods to obtain these records were time consuming. Future students of Century America should be advised that community and field research efforts require greater time commitments rather than secondary source research on databases.

Regarding our project contract, adjustments were needed to accommodate the various research challenges I encountered. Arguably, despite these changes, I upheld my commitments listed in the contact. I was initially responsible for the creation of the Call Field Page, Oil Boom Page, Bibliography Page, the Timeline, and half of the Women’s Page.  According to the contract, the Call Field Page was intended to include a detailed list of all service members that perished while training and include the schematics of Call Field Base’s construction. As I was conducting my community research, I overheard concerns that the list of men who perished was also under dispute. However, having compared the memorial stone at the Wichita Falls Municipal Airport with the records within the Call Field Engineer and Call Field Stabilizer, I feel confident that the memorial stone accurately represents those who died while training. Unfortunately, I was unable to locate the original blue prints of the aviation field. In addition, I did not include a memorial listing of all fallen airmen and I omitted the timeline. Debatably, the interactive carousals of the Call Field publication are more useful to student researchers and are more fascinating to local Call Field enthusiasts. Although these carousals do not display the graphics or dates in a linear fashion, viewers are able to see the memorial listings in the original publications. The time required to upload all six carousals made it impossible to construct the timeline. The Oil Page and Bibliography Page were completed with few deviations from the project contract. Since Laura omitted the Genealogy page, I was unable to summarize the individual entrepreneurial families’ successes which in part defined the North Texas Oil Boom. Instead, I focused my discussion on the development of North Texas oil businesses and Call Field. Laura was also unable write the section regarding the Spanish Flu. Therefore, I undertook the Spanish Flu research and arguably satisfied all related conditions according to the contract.

Laura Galbraith’s adjusted contributions included the Women’s Role, the Timeline, uploading the map, and writing half of the home page. She primarily focused on the technological aspects including setting the color scheme, selecting the background image, and setting up the pages. Laura sufficiently described Women’s Roles during The Great War. This section does not deviate from the contract.

Overall, I believe that Laura and I are pleased with the website despite the few deviations from our contract. Unfortunately, we were unable to invest the necessary time to integrate our YouTube videos on an interactive map. These videos may possibly become components on the timeline depending on Laura’s availability. Our project’s accomplishments represent the community’s involvement. Many of the sources that were vital toward our analysis were given and used with permission by various people and entities across North Texas. This process of digitization has helped Laura and I become better historians.

The Spanish Flu & North Texas Oil

Last Wednesday and Thursday, I buried myself in the Wichita County Archives. I came across over fifty articles regarding the Spanish Flu and the Oil Boom in Wichita Falls. The archivists helped me search the endless stacks of print to locate these rare records. I contacted the United Regional Health Care System of Wichita Falls (The Wichita Falls Hospital), the Wichita County Records office, and the Texas Department of Vital Records. None of these governmental agencies possessed any records of the Spanish Flu in Wichita Falls. The Texas Department of Vital Records stated that most of the Texas medical records before the year of 1930 had been destroyed. No justification was given to why the records were missing. Possibly, these records were damaged in a fire. The newspaper records at the Wichita County Archives may be my only source regarding the Spanish Flu.

I attempted to go back to the Wichita County archives today (03/24) however, the archive was closed. The archivists were all sick. The museum curator did not know when they would return. Hopefully, they don’t have the flu (haha). I ventured over the county library and obtained a source relating to to the “Women’s Movement” of Wichita Falls. I gave this source to Laura so she can begin outlining the women s contribution to Wichita Falls home front.  The sources relating to the Oil Boom I predict will be easier to organize. North Texas produced nearly forty percent of the entire oil output of the Mid-continent. These records have not been challenging to locate. However, Laura and I will encounter difficulty in our attempt to independently economically assess the significance of Call Field in relation to the Oil Boom. Arguably, we would have to compare Wichita Falls to another city in the region which also experienced an oil boom without a military airfield. I am afraid that given our time constraint, this may be impossible.

Like many of our peers, Laura and I will have to work hard to achieve our April first deadline. Where did the time go? I feel several sleepless nights may be upon us. However, we have most of our content organized and ready to be published. On Wednesday (03/25), we will work on a website theme and hopefully transform our outline into a functioning website. Laura reported to me that our paper received the panel award at the Alpha Chi conference in Chicago. Such news is only encouraging. In addition, our research was accepted at the Mississippi State University Undergraduate Conference.

History & Education

In his article, The Future of American History, Steve Hochstadt evaluates the increasing focus on minorities within America’s history classrooms and lecture halls. Hochstadt argues that this new recognition derives from researchers seeking to uncover untold history. According to Hochstadt, conservatives feel threatened that these new perspectives degrade from the traditional historical American narrative. The focus on minorities circumvents attention away from the success of American progress and society. However, like Hochstadt, I agree that these minority focused researchers are performing a vital function: researching. Many minorities have been subjected to discrimination and unfortunately this prejudice also applies to many historical interpretations. Including unpleasant details such as Indian massacres should not be perceived as a blow to national identity. Instead, such details enhance our current progress by setting true indicators of success. These markers also encourage discussion of present issues and inspire new solutions. Given recent issues regarding race relations, dialogue concerning the historical role of traditionally discriminated groups provides for a true understanding of racial tensions. By attempting to evade the darker elements of history in the name of American exceptionalism, conservatives endorse the continual marginalization of America’s most discriminated groups.

Elaine Carey’s article titled, The C3 Framework: Advocating for K – 12 Social Studies Education, evaluates a new proposed framework regarding history in primary and secondary education. Carey regards the change as positive. The framework is expected to foster students with critical thinking skills. I welcome open dialogue regarding how history is taught and I believe that social studies should be emphasized. Carey states that this education initiative recognizes history as vital to the development of good citizens. However, I am suspicious of the educational methodology. Arguably, the challenges facing education relate more to the hurdles created by the methodology that does not value individual development. Although C3 does not necessarily impose uniform teaching practices, a better solution to encourage critical thinking would to require teachers to be better educated in their respective fields.

Contract For Website

Laura Galbraith and Joseph Hadwal
Contract Digital Humanities

About the Project:

This project’s goal is to condense, accumulate, and display the history of Wichita Falls Texas during the years 1914-1919. To complete the website the researchers will include numerous primary and secondary sources found in the Public Library of Wichita Falls, Special Collections at Midwestern State University, and the North Texas Museum Wichita Falls County archives. The end goal of this research project is to create a detailed record of digital history of Wichita Falls and the air base Call Field in relation to World War One. Because of the community involvement the intended audience will be students in primary and secondary schools as wells as university staff and students. The research is important to the community and thus the readability of the website will be aimed to accommodate a high school reading level.

The researcher’s thematic narrative for the history of Wichita Falls and air base Call Field website are:

1. Call Field:

The Call Field section will include photographs, summaries of historical significant events, and a listing of all service members who died while training. The North Texas Museum and the Wichita county archives have provided access to all relevant sources. These primary works include photographs, base schematics, and city directories. The Wichita county archive also lists the servicemen who died while training at Call Field. These sources however, lack consensus regarding the exact number of men who died. The research team will investigate this discrepancy. The Midwestern State University Special Collections contains secondary sources. Such works include a variety of local authors whose backgrounds range from history, education, and news reporting. However, this diversity presents challenges regarding credibility. Many of these secondary sources were published by non-academic presses and in some instances lack bibliographies. Before publishing the work, these sources will need to be further verified by other works. In addition to the base, the project will include a section regarding military technology. The subpage will comprise of weapons and airplanes summaries along with interactive videos.

2. Genealogy of Families:

This page will provide the origins of specific families that became successful from the oil boom in Wichita Falls in 1917-1918. The families include the McCullough, Bridwell, McCoy, and Killingsworth, Kemp, and Kell family. This page will include the beginnings of the family’s success and progress to modern day impact on the community. The majority of the information will be pulled from the public library archive and Wichita Falls directory. The amount of details will vary depending on the family and information available.

3. Spanish Flu:

This page will provide the viewer with a detailed account of the impact the Spanish Flue on the Wichita Falls community in 1918.-1919s. The page will include the first diagnosed patient to the conclusion of the epidemic. The page will be made up of mainly primary sources which include newspaper articles found in the Public Library and in the North Texas Museum in Wichita County archives.

4. Women’s role:

The research team has yet to investigate women’s role regarding World War One in Wichita Falls in depth. Preliminary research indicates that Women’s contributions were greatest in education and medicine. During the World War One era, Wichita Falls began constructing a new junior college and hospital. The team is also looking into how women contributed to the growing business sector. The page will organize women’s role by trade and describe how these contributions aided the war effort.

5. Oil Boom:

This section will include information pertaining to how business affected the War effort. North Texas witnessed an oil boom between the years of 1916 and 1918. This new capital created entrepreneurial dynasties such as Kemp and Kell. The page will include a photographs and historical summaries of significant contributions made by private citizens and local business that aided to the establishment of Call Aviation Field.

6. Bibliography:

Bibliography Page:
This page will provide an annotated list of all sources that were used to construct the website. A section of the page will be devoted towards giving special thanks to members of the community who have helped the research team. The team will also list the archives and museums that have granted permission to use photographs and materials. The page will also feature a “Further Research” section which will allow members of the community to build upon the team’s progress.
Schedule of Due Dates:

March 4: Scan in newspapers and images for narrative and bibliography. Academic paper will be complete along with slide show presentation.

March 11: Have a detailed narrative for each page of the website ready for review.

March 18: All videos will be recorded, saved and prepped for editing. About the Website, genealogy, and Spanish Flu will be complete.

March 25: Remaining pages will be completed. Final videos ready and placed on You Tube along with website.

April 1: Draft of Website Due

April 8: All images scanned and finalized along with finished time line and google maps

April 15: All YouTube videos and interactive videos complete

April 22: Final Draft of Website Due

Research, Research, & Moore Research

Moore Library

This week I invested time into Midwestern State University’s specialty collection. A majority of the collection was donated by Nolan A. Moore III and is named in his honor. The pressure is on, Laura and I have been accepted to St. Edward’s University Regional Phi Alpha Theta Conference on March 7th. Laura is helping by overseeing the creative aspects of our presentation and sharing her research with me to craft our conference paper. However, the paper has not been written yet so I will have to invest more time into the archives in the coming week. Our paper is titled: Wichita Falls At War: Call Field Pilot Training During The Great War. I will evaluate how the Call Field base created an aviation identity for Wichita Falls. Our abstract is listed below:

     During the Great War Allied forces lacked the necessary airman to conduct the reconnaissance missions so important to modern battle plans. In response to a growing demand for skilled pilots, the U.S. Department of War established multiple training bases. Wichita Falls, in particular, was selected to host Call Field because of the city’s growing population and economic power. The region’s booming oil economy suggested the city could support a substantial airfield. Moreover, the North Texas climate was ideal for training future officers and pilots. As a result, Wichita Falls experienced rapid growth because of the airfield and the consequent industrial development. At Call Field hundreds of officers were trained to fly the newly designed Curtiss JN-4 (Jenny). The field was one of thirty two bases established during World War One and made significant contributions to the war effort through the two Call Field trained squadrons that flew important missions on the Allied Front. The success of Call Field and its training mission created an aviation identity for Wichita Falls. Such a reputation influenced the establishment in 1941 of Sheppard Air Force base, a NATO training base, at Wichita Falls.

While going through the archives, I learned that Kemp and Kell (local business tycoons) raised over $35,000 dollars at a public form to supplement the Department of War’s cost to purchase the land for the airfield. Wichita Falls Chamber of Commerce also contributed by installing the utilities for free (Boyd, Fosty, Tuttle: Sustaining the Wings: A Fifty Year History of Sheppard Air Force Base). I have noticed that several primary sources conflict with one another regarding specifics such as location and data. For example, a source I pulled suggested that the actual Call Field Base was located at present day Cunningham Elementary school (3/4ths to a full mile away from where other sources place the base). I assume that this is normal given inaccuracies associated with eyewitness accounts and memory.

After I get back from the Model UN conference in St. Louis, Missouri on Sunday, I will continue digging through the archives.

The Sky Is Not The Limit When You’re A History Major

Laura and I spent most of the early afternoon going through the Wichita County Archives. We made significant progress regarding our research over the local Spanish Flu epidemic and historical photographs of Call Field. During the 1930’s a secretary constructed a  list of all articles in the local newspapers  that mentioned the Spanish Flu epidemic in Wichita Falls. The listing will help Laura and I determine in detail how the flu affected the local community. Preliminary research showed that the flu caused the Texas Oklahoma boarder to close. We learned yesterday that the courthouse and many public buildings were used to house the excess patients. Particularity funny for Laura and I, was an article that described the protests of the judges who disfavored the idea of their personal chambers being used for the sick. Regarding photographs, I came across eighteen pictures of Call Field during the World War One time frame and an aerial picture of Lake Wichita that showed the famous hotel and boardwalk. The photographs were not marked with specific dates. Unfortunately, someone had glued the pictures onto black construction paper. The glue damaged some of the photographs and made photo replication difficult. Laura arranged an airplane ride for us so we can retake some of the photographs for the purpose of comparison.

The Photo (Below) depicts Call Field men possibly by barracks.

Provided and used with permission by the Wichita County Archives of the North Texas Museum
Provided and used with permission by the Wichita County Archives of the North Texas Museum

 

This  photograph (Below) shows a building on Call Field. Laura and I will try to identify which building exactly.

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This Aerial photograph (Below)  shows lake Wichita during circa 1914-1917

Provided and used with permission by the Wichita County Archives of the North Texas Museum
Provided and used with permission by the Wichita County Archives of the North Texas Museum

 

Members of the machine shop pose in front of a WW1 plane.

Provided and used with permission by the Wichita County Archives of the North Texas Museum
Provided and used with permission by the Wichita County Archives of the North Texas Museum

 

Call “Aviation” Field had messenger pidgins. (Below)

Provided and used with permission by the Wichita County Archives of the North Texas Museum
Provided and used with permission by the Wichita County Archives of the North Texas Museum

 

Call Field was a training base for the War Department and several deaths occurred due to accidents. (Laura and I will look for an exact number of deaths)

Provided and used with permission by the Wichita County Archives of the North Texas Museum
Provided and used with permission by the Wichita County Archives of the North Texas Museum

 

Laura and I plan to retake this photo (Below) in a modern plane. (The second road from the left is Call Field Road today)

Provided and used with permission by the Wichita County Archives of the North Texas Museum
Provided and used with permission by the Wichita County Archives of the North Texas Museum

 

Men stand at attention at Call Field Base (Below – Circa 1916-1918)

Provided and used with permission by the Wichita County Archives of the North Texas Museum
Provided and used with permission by the Wichita County Archives of the North Texas Museum

 

Possibly a Jenny returning or taking off from a practice mission at Call Field.

Provided and used with permission by the Wichita County Archives of the North Texas Museum
Provided and used with permission by the Wichita County Archives of the North Texas Museum

 

Aerial view of Wichita Falls during World War One (Below).

Provided and used with permission by the Wichita County Archives of the North Texas Museum
Provided and used with permission by the Wichita County Archives of the North Texas Museum

 

Class photograph of Squadron B at Call Field Base (Below).

Provided and used with permission by the Wichita County Archives of the North Texas Museum
Provided and used with permission by the Wichita County Archives of the North Texas Museum

 

Another crashed Jenny at Call Field (Below).

Provided and used with permission by the Wichita County Archives of the North Texas Museum
Provided and used with permission by the Wichita County Archives of the North Texas Museum

 

Men outside building at Call Field (Below – Laura and I will attempt to further identify photo).

Provided and used with permission by the Wichita County Archives of the North Texas Museum
Provided and used with permission by the Wichita County Archives of the North Texas Museum

 

School Building at Call Field Base (Below).

Provided and used with permission by the Wichita County Archives of the North Texas Museum
Provided and used with permission by the Wichita County Archives of the North Texas Museum

 

Class and School Building at Call Field Airbase (Below – Water-tower in background).

Provided and used with permission by the Wichita County Archives of the North Texas Museum
Provided and used with permission by the Wichita County Archives of the North Texas Museum

 

Laura and I believe that this building was the headquarters to the base. (We will look further into our assumption)

Provided and used with permission by the Wichita County Archives of the North Texas Museum
Provided and used with permission by the Wichita County Archives of the North Texas Museum

 

This advertisement calls for men to join the War effort by working a support service at Call Field base.

Provided and used with permission by the Wichita County Archives of the North Texas Museum
Provided and used with permission by the Wichita County Archives of the North Texas Museum

 

This aerial photograph shows the city of Wichita Falls during World War One (Below).

Provided and used with permission by the Wichita County Archives of the North Texas Museum
Provided and used with permission by the Wichita County Archives of the North Texas Museum

By far Laura’s favorite, this photograph shows Call Field base.  The first bend in the road is where current day Wasabi Gill is located.

Provided and used with permission by the Wichita County Archives of the North Texas Museum
Provided and used with permission by the Wichita County Archives of the North Texas Museum

“Ain’t No Mountain High Enough”

Laura and I concentrated our efforts this week towards field work. On Thursday, we visited several locations of historical significance regarding Call Field. Primary sources from the Wichita County Archives suggested that Lake Wichita was a popular recreational destination for the airman and the citizens during the World War One era. Lake Wichita featured a hotel and served as a resort location of North Texas. Laura and I visited the lake and made a video of us on top of ‘Mount Wichita.’ This ‘mountain’ is just a manmade hill, most likely constructed out of dredged sediment or other loose materials from the surrounding area. The video will be integrated into the eventual timeline and Google Map on the finished website. The media will serve as an interactive component for the future audience.

(Featured below is a panoramic view of Lake Wichita – Click on Image to view)

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IMG_0499IMG_0496

 

Following advice given by John W. Zimmerman, Laura and I investigated the ‘last structure’ of Call Field. The air field consisted of 46 different buildings. However, due to the urban sprawl of post-World War Two, suburbia claimed all but the horse’s stable of the Chief Military officer of Call Field. Today, this structure is used as a storage facility by University Academy (daycare facility – not associated with Midwestern State University). Laura and I registered at the front office and were led through a series of rooms filled with napping toddlers before we reached the back entrance to conduct our filming. The daycare personal and mechanics next door were equally intrigued by our assignment.

(Featured below is a picture of the structure)

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According to historical maps, the entrance to Call Field existed approximately between where current day Idlewood Drive and Boren Avenue intersect with Call Field Road. Laura and I filmed at this location and noted the rapid development occurring in this area. The backdrop of past and continual urbanization obscures the average bystander’s recognition of the threshold that had once been the entrance to Call Field.  The only indication provided is an oddly placed curve in the road (much to the hatred of local drivers). After filming, Laura and I enjoyed sushi at Wasabi grill.

On Wednesday, I met with Bryson Glittenberg who is a military history and gun enthusiast. He is seeking a B.A. in history from Midwestern State University. Mr. Glittenberg possesses a gun collection containing authentic firearms used during the World War One era. The items of interest include a Springfield 1903, a United State Rifle Caliber .30 Model 1903, a  Lee Enfield Mk. 1, and a  Colt 1911.  All firearms are located at his family’s private ranch. Mr. Glittenberg accepted my request to appear on Laura’s and my website to discuss the history of the guns. I will travel to Mr. Glittenberg’s ranch to conduct the filming.  Although firearms are not the immediate focus of our project, Laura and I believe that Mr. Glittenberg’s contribution will provide a unique source that may illuminate other avenues to later explore.

IMG_0508

 

Reporting For Duty: Call Field Command

Laura and I have been developing the Google Map feature for our website. Thankfully, Laura is technologically inclined which made the process much easier. I helped plot historical points of significant value. Laura discovered a ruler tool to more accurately measure the distance between locations. We encountered several learning curves such as learning how to save our progress. Laura and I overcame these obstacles. In addition to the maps, I took photos of the where the central command of Call Field Air Force Base was once located.

CentralCommand

 

Above: The building houses the Tran star Ambulance Service along with a law firm and an engineering firm. During the operation of the airfield, this location served as the central command for the Call Field. The original building was torn down.
CallFieldRoadAbove: This street (now named “Call Field Road”) served as the central road through the airfield. Central Command was located to the left.

Hanger RowAbove: This photo was taken in front of the Trans Ambulance building facing Call Field Road. This residential area, identified by property records, is called University Park Boulevard. I am still searching when it was built however, based on conversations with archivists the neighborhood was likely built during the late 1940s and early 1950s. During the years of Call Field, the area along the road was occupied by the base’s airplane hangers.

Historical MarkerAbove: When facing the Trans Star Ambulance building, this historical marker is located to the left. (I apologize for the bad quality, I was not aware of the glare until later – I will replace this photo with a better version) The maker provides a brief overview of Call Field and the role Call Field served as a training facility for American pilots.

Digital History: More like Digital Design & Marketing

Having evaluated several history sites, I have a greater admiration for web design. Sites with poor layouts detracted from the organization’s historical narrative. I evaluated The Emancipation Project, the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Database, and the Digital History Site by the University of Houston. Visitors to The Emancipation Project website are greeted by a somber color scheme and an entrance page. The black background, steel gray text box, and the navy blue accents appear dark and unwelcoming. Unlike a book’s preface, the entrance page hinders readers by representing an obstacle between the audience and the desired material. Introductory messages can be integrated into the main page of the website. Arguably, modern internet users demand this simplification. Upon entering the site, visitors are not provided with any guidance regarding the links and the graph that both appear in light gray text against a gray background.  The media links require QuickTime downloads to function and lack keys to interpret the maps. In addition, the website’s logo lacks clarity. The phrase The Emancipation Project is bolded in white font against a light colored image. The Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Database’s logo is also difficult to read due to the small text size of the subheading and the word Voyager appearing almost transparent with the background color. The Slave Trade Database’s website materials are also aligned completely to the left of the webpage. Alignment issues may derive from screen resolution differences but these issues can be corrected with HTML adjustments. However, the Slave Trade Database possesses user friendly navigational tools that allow visitors to seamlessly transition through the various topics. The interactive map and easy to read popup text encourages readers to explore the databases. Unlike The Emancipation Project, the Slave Trade Database features bright colors that foster a sense of cleanliness and efficiency. Although the University of Houston’s Digital History Site uses darker colors, the ambiance of professionalism remains intact. Houston’s website features crisp accents and a well-organized menu. The links are easy to read and are also presented on an awesome interactive graphic that allows the visitor to choose a timeframe and reference material. The information is presented on a collage of American visual history that serves as the backdrop. The navigation tools also permits users to shift effortlessly through the many subjects to gain access to primary sources.

Regarding my own blog, I understand the importance of how efficient design dictates the successes of digital history. The Emancipation Project contained valuable sources however, due to a poor layout; the evidence was not as appealing as was the information gathered from Houston’s Digital History Site. The new challenge for academic professionals is to learn how to market their skill and find success amongst nonprofessionals in this new digital medium. My blog will demonstrate this struggle as I will attempt to learn the features of WordPress and create a site that is visually pleasing and presents World War One Wichita Falls.