“Creating Meaning in a Sea of Information”

That was the title of Part 4 in Writing History in the Digital Age, which is part of next week’s upcoming assignment.  In this article, that title was what stood out to me- “a sea of information”.  They even mentioned an earlier site we looked at and also my favorite digital history site, The Valley of the Shadow.  I went ahead and completed this assignment because once again I’m at home in the snow.  Hopefully we have class tomorrow, so Ben and I can run by Special Collections, at least for a few minutes.  I want to speak with Gene again about finalizing what I will be able to digitize for my site from the UNCA Archives (regarding copyright).

Even though my research has been slightly sidetracked with all the bad weather, I don’t feel overwhelming amounts of pressure that I’m not going to be able to obtain enough information for the website.  Rather, it’s sifting through the availability of information (that “sea of information” again) and presenting what I feel are the most important pieces.  I already know I’m going to have to be careful about not putting up too many documents and photographs and such, simply because there won’t be enough time.  I’m a very visual person, so I also have to be diligent about integrating documents and photographs and the like with enough interpretation that the site finds an ideal balance between an archive and a narrative.  Another key point in the article.

I also looked at the AHA Perspectives article on Marx in the Mountains.  It was about hunger and poverty in Vermont and linking the teachings of Marx to those problems in the Vermont economy.  I related to the information because it sounded a lot like Western North Carolina, and also because this is a very important piece of my website.  The rural poor- in my neck of the woods, classified not so much by hunger, but definitely by poverty.  Self-sufficiency and semi-subsistence lifestyles are themes I want my part of the website to highlight for this area as well.  I think those themes have always been important to this region (especially so during a World War) and that they are still important.

I’ve noticed lots of folks went ahead and posted their contracts.  I shared mine only via Google Docs with Dr. Pearson and Dr. McClurken, but I’m happy to include a blurb regarding my “side” of mine and Ben’s joint website.  My plan is as follows and comes directly from my contract:

Upon entering the “Rural” side of the website, the visitor will come to a homepage with a black and white background of photos from the Great War time period.  The visitor can then choose to click on one of the following headings: Farms and Small Towns, Churches, City Laborers, Rural Color, Prohibition Roots, Flood of 1916, or the Railroad.  Upon clicking one of these headings, an additional page will open with the option of opening the subcategories: Newspaper Articles and Photographs, Ledgers/Records, Diaries/Letters/Journal Entries, Maps, Other Photographs.  Each of these subcategories will likely contain at least one image, perhaps more than one, as well as a narrative to go along with the image.  For example, the “Other Photographs” subcategory under the Flood of 1916 will contain black and white photographs of the occurrence, as well as a small narrative to let the visitor know the background story.  Within the narrative, there may be one or two highlighted words or phrases that link the “Rural” side of the story back over to the “Urban” side of the story.  Again, with the example of the Flood of 1916, there may be a narrative as to the type of damage done to a particular business in downtown Asheville, and that business name would be hyperlinked back to the “Urban” side of the website along with information about that particular business.

So, the plan next week is to start consolidating that “sea of information” and to see if Ben and I can streamline it into a working, interactive, and inviting website.

Mission Statement

Our goal is to showcase the Sarasota community’s experiences during WWI and the Spanish Influenza. While we plan to touch upon both of these events specifically, we want to dedicate a lot of our site to broader experiences of the community during the time period. What happened in Sarasota during the Great War, and how relevant (or irrelevant) to these changes was what was happening in the international community?

Thus far we have been unable to find anything related to Sarasota during the Spanish Influenza. We have read that, historically, Florida has been a haven for those avoiding disease. In our research we have come across some references to malaria. If we find more related to that, perhaps we will include it.

Besides the information itself, a large goal of our project is to present this information in an accurate, comprehensible manner through a digital medium. We plan to maintain historical integrity while also making the site accessible to non-academics. We will use images and avoid large blocks of text, along with an appropriate theme, to make the site attractive.

The intended audience of our website are students (who are particularly interested in Sarasota history or want to look at the site as an example of a digital history project) and the those who live here.

Layout:

The homepage will introduce our project with an “About” page and will display the Century America logo. The sections will be displayed at the top of the site.

  1. the urbanization/developments of Sarasota
    • Focused on information found in the Sarasota-Times along with photographs.
    • Subheading including timeline
    • Subheading on the role of agriculture in Sarasota
  2. The oral history from Harriet Burns
    • Ideally this will come with a transcription.
  3. the military experience in sarasota
    • Subheading on the naval militia
      • Mostly informed by the Sarasota-Times.
    • Will include discussion on the city’s role in national war efforts
      • Liberty Bonds
      • Red Cross service
    • display of WWI service cards from the Florida Memory site
  4. Social experiences (guided by the diary of the young woman that Harriet has)
    • Transcriptions, and possible scans, of the diary kept by a young woman who lived in Sarasota during the 1910s.
    • the Women’s Club
    • Possible commentary related to the Women’s Club’s role in the war effort.
  5. Bibliography
  6. About the researchers section

Tools:

For our site, we plan on using the Hemingway Rewritten theme. The layout is simple and easy to navigate. It neatly displays the different sections at the top of the page.

Because much of our story involves the development of Sarasota, a TimelineJS will be included. This timeline will chronicle the growth of the city during the 1910s. For example, when a new road was approved and when it was built.

Final Cut Pro will be used for editing the oral history component of the site.

Timeline:

Feb. 26: Return to the Sarasota History Center to finish taking pictures of relevant articles of the Sarasota-Times.

Feb. 28: Meet with Harriet again. Scan her photographs and copies of the diary of a young woman who lived in Sarasota during the 1910s.

March 6: Set up theme, create skeleton structure of site, start writing up some of the sections

March 15-18: Have video completed along with the transcription

Apr. 2: First version due

Apr. 22: Revised version due

Distribution of Labor:

Joy: I will make the timeline about the urbanization of the city. In order to do this, I will read all relevant articles in the Sarasota-Times. From this I will get relevant dates. I will also use the information found in these articles to describe what went into building up Sarasota.

I will similarly read the newspapers for relevant information about the narrative surrounding Sarasota’s military involvement in WWI, particularly its naval militia.

Kana: I will work on the layout of the website and edit the video. I will also focus on the women’s club and agriculture section of the site. The sources I will be using include guidebooks, newspaper articles, and secondary readings on Sarasota history.

 

Contract

Hello World.

Here is a link to our contract draft.

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1zL9hgCRVBqtQGeJC-n3ri2OQwiC3aIbJNkZ_HdiZSLk/edit?usp=sharing

Please let me know if you have problem viewing it.

-Victoria

Contract For Website

Laura Galbraith and Joseph Hadwal
Contract Digital Humanities

About the Project:

This project’s goal is to condense, accumulate, and display the history of Wichita Falls Texas during the years 1914-1919. To complete the website the researchers will include numerous primary and secondary sources found in the Public Library of Wichita Falls, Special Collections at Midwestern State University, and the North Texas Museum Wichita Falls County archives. The end goal of this research project is to create a detailed record of digital history of Wichita Falls and the air base Call Field in relation to World War One. Because of the community involvement the intended audience will be students in primary and secondary schools as wells as university staff and students. The research is important to the community and thus the readability of the website will be aimed to accommodate a high school reading level.

The researcher’s thematic narrative for the history of Wichita Falls and air base Call Field website are:

1. Call Field:

The Call Field section will include photographs, summaries of historical significant events, and a listing of all service members who died while training. The North Texas Museum and the Wichita county archives have provided access to all relevant sources. These primary works include photographs, base schematics, and city directories. The Wichita county archive also lists the servicemen who died while training at Call Field. These sources however, lack consensus regarding the exact number of men who died. The research team will investigate this discrepancy. The Midwestern State University Special Collections contains secondary sources. Such works include a variety of local authors whose backgrounds range from history, education, and news reporting. However, this diversity presents challenges regarding credibility. Many of these secondary sources were published by non-academic presses and in some instances lack bibliographies. Before publishing the work, these sources will need to be further verified by other works. In addition to the base, the project will include a section regarding military technology. The subpage will comprise of weapons and airplanes summaries along with interactive videos.

2. Genealogy of Families:

This page will provide the origins of specific families that became successful from the oil boom in Wichita Falls in 1917-1918. The families include the McCullough, Bridwell, McCoy, and Killingsworth, Kemp, and Kell family. This page will include the beginnings of the family’s success and progress to modern day impact on the community. The majority of the information will be pulled from the public library archive and Wichita Falls directory. The amount of details will vary depending on the family and information available.

3. Spanish Flu:

This page will provide the viewer with a detailed account of the impact the Spanish Flue on the Wichita Falls community in 1918.-1919s. The page will include the first diagnosed patient to the conclusion of the epidemic. The page will be made up of mainly primary sources which include newspaper articles found in the Public Library and in the North Texas Museum in Wichita County archives.

4. Women’s role:

The research team has yet to investigate women’s role regarding World War One in Wichita Falls in depth. Preliminary research indicates that Women’s contributions were greatest in education and medicine. During the World War One era, Wichita Falls began constructing a new junior college and hospital. The team is also looking into how women contributed to the growing business sector. The page will organize women’s role by trade and describe how these contributions aided the war effort.

5. Oil Boom:

This section will include information pertaining to how business affected the War effort. North Texas witnessed an oil boom between the years of 1916 and 1918. This new capital created entrepreneurial dynasties such as Kemp and Kell. The page will include a photographs and historical summaries of significant contributions made by private citizens and local business that aided to the establishment of Call Aviation Field.

6. Bibliography:

Bibliography Page:
This page will provide an annotated list of all sources that were used to construct the website. A section of the page will be devoted towards giving special thanks to members of the community who have helped the research team. The team will also list the archives and museums that have granted permission to use photographs and materials. The page will also feature a “Further Research” section which will allow members of the community to build upon the team’s progress.
Schedule of Due Dates:

March 4: Scan in newspapers and images for narrative and bibliography. Academic paper will be complete along with slide show presentation.

March 11: Have a detailed narrative for each page of the website ready for review.

March 18: All videos will be recorded, saved and prepped for editing. About the Website, genealogy, and Spanish Flu will be complete.

March 25: Remaining pages will be completed. Final videos ready and placed on You Tube along with website.

April 1: Draft of Website Due

April 8: All images scanned and finalized along with finished time line and google maps

April 15: All YouTube videos and interactive videos complete

April 22: Final Draft of Website Due

Project Contract

Mission Statement:

 Our goal is to showcase the Sarasota community’s experiences during WWI and the Spanish Influenza. While we plan to touch upon both of these events specifically, we want to dedicate a lot of our site to broader experiences of the community during the time period. What happened in Sarasota during the Great War, and how relevant (or irrelevant) to these changes was what was happening in the international community?

Thus far we have been unable to find anything related to Sarasota during the Spanish Influenza. We have read that, historically, Florida has been a haven for those avoiding disease. In our research we have come across some references to malaria. If we find more related to that, perhaps we will include it.

Besides the information itself, a large goal of our project is to present this information in an accurate, comprehensible manner through a digital medium. We plan to maintain historical integrity while also making the site accessible to non-academics. We will use images and avoid large blocks of text, along with an appropriate theme, to make the site attractive.

The intended audience of our website are students (who are particularly interested in Sarasota history or want to look at the site as an example of a digital history project) and the those who live here.

Layout:

The homepage will introduce our project with an “About” page and will display the Century America logo. The sections will be displayed at the top of the site.

These sections include:

1. The urbanization/developments of Sarasota

-Focused on information found in the Sarasota-Times along with photographs.

-Subheading including timeline

-Subheading on the role of agriculture in Sarasota

-The Oral History from Harriet Burns

-Ideally this will come with a transcription.

2. The military experience in Sarasota

-Subheading on the naval militia

-Will include discussion of the city’s role in national war efforts

-Liberty Bonds

-Red Cross service

-Display of WWI service cards from the Florida Memory site

3. Social experiences

-Transcriptions, and possible scans, of the diary kept by a young woman who lived in Sarasota during the 1910s.

-The Women’s Club

-Possible commentary related to the Women’s Club’s role in the war effort.

4. Bibliography

5. About the researchers section

Tools:

For our site, we plan on using the Hemingway Rewritten theme. The layout is simple and easy to navigate. It neatly displays the different sections at the top of the page.

Because much of our story involves the development of Sarasota, a TimelineJS will be included. This timeline will chronicle the growth of the city during the 1910s. For example, when a new road was approved and when it was built.

Final Cut Pro will be used for editing the oral history component of the site.

Timeline:

Feb. 26: Return to the Sarasota History Center to finish taking pictures of relevant articles of the Sarasota-Times.

Feb. 28: Meet with Harriet again. Scan her photographs and copies of the diary of a young woman who lived in Sarasota during the 1910s.

March 6: Set up theme, create skeleton structure of site, start writing up some of the sections

March 15-18: Have video completed along with the transcription

Apr. 2: First version due

Apr. 22: Revised version due

Distribution of Labor:

Joy: I will make the timeline about the urbanization of the city. In order to do this, I will read all relevant articles in the Sarasota-Times. From this I will get relevant dates. I will also use the information found in these articles to describe what went into building up Sarasota.

I will similarly read the newspapers for relevant information about the narrative surrounding Sarasota’s military involvement in WWI, particularly its naval militia.

Kana: I will work on the layout of the website and edit the video. I will also focus on the women’s club and agriculture section of the site. The sources I will be using include guidebooks, newspaper articles, and secondary readings on Sarasota history.

 

Research Update

It has been difficult to accomplish much in the recent days because of the snow. UVA Wise is nearing two complete weeks with missed class and so I have not been able to look at anything in the archives that I thought could be helpful in that time. Hopefully that is something that can be done next week. What I have been able to accomplish is continuing to look through the large secondary volume that we acquired from the library. I was also able to find another book about Dickenson County that I did not expect to be very helpful but it was on fact very interesting. It is “School and Community History of Dickenson County, Virginia.” The best source from the book is a biography of individual teachers that worked in Dickenson County and it was particularly detailed for those working in the early 1900s because there were so few schools and teachers. I discovered that many of those teachers left their posts to serve in the Great War and most returned home to return to their teaching jobs. I did not read enough to see if there was any connection to the opening of the Dickenson Memorial & Industrial High School in 1921 but it would be interesting to see if these war veteran teachers were involved in the movement to create the school.
Victoria and I also discovered something very interesting about one of the founders of our college. I looked to see who the local congressional representative was during the war and found out that it was C. Bascom Slemp. Slemp is namesake to Uva-Wise’s student center as well as the local Slemp Foundation, a philanthropic group that gives scholarships to many Uva-Wise students. Our hopes were to contact the Slemp Foundation about any possible papers they may have collected for the Slemp family during this time or any other assistance they could have provided but that hope was buried under two feet of snow. This recent time setback will force Victoria and I to work harder, especially to view the resources in the college’s archives, but I am still confident that we will be able to make up for lost time in the next couple of weeks.

Is there a window open?

My research has been put on ice.  I should say, my research at the local archive has been delayed, twice, but I have been very active in exploring the local newspapers from the comfort of my apartment.  This has allowed me to develop a working plan for my side of the website.  I will provide five tabs, each focusing on an aspect of Asheville during the years 1914-1919.  The five tabs are:

 

-An Interactive Map of the ‘Land of Sky’

-Local Personalities

-Escape! to Asheville

-How to be a Patriot in Asheville

-A Newspaper yearly scrapbook

 

The map will be tagged with significant locations, include a brief description of the landmark, and offer any links that may connect to other information found on the site.

 

The biography section will feature a collection of short narratives, highlighting some of the key players in Asheville during the Great War.  Again, this section should connect with several other points within the site including the newspaper section and exhibit on public patriotism.

 

Escape! to Asheville is really an antithesis.  Asheville enjoyed enormous prosperity during the war, especially in the early years and was a resort destination often used for an escape from the war, rather than a city with which to view normalities of wartime.  I have already found many articles referring to our city as unique in its role as an oasis from the war in Europe.  The local economy seemed to proper as well, evident in the many buildings that sprouted up during this gilded age.  Also attracted to Asheville were the rich and famous, who used the ‘Land of Sky’ as the French countryside of the Americas, vacationing here in order to avoid those ravaged lands.

 

Because I am exploring the public side of Asheville, it only makes sense that I should inevitably run into wartime propaganda.  And I did.  As I mentioned in an earlier post, I have found photograph collections that feature public displays of wartime presence from parades to demonstrations to collective efforts to help fuel the war machine.  The amount of information is becoming overwhelming, which is why I have organized these categories.

 

Lastly, the newspaper scrapbooks will contain digital ‘clips’ I have collected from newspapers.com that related to Asheville’s experience during the Great War and the infuenza outbreak.  Also, an album of wartime advertisements will be included in this section as they are numerous and illustrative.

 

Ashley and I will (hopefully) get to go to the downtown library after the weekend, but in the meantime we are visiting the UNCA Special Collections on Friday.  I’m sure Gene and Colin will be able to point out a few things we might want to explore, and Ashley and I both understand this is a fluid, dynamic process (when above 32° F).

 

Stay warm.

 

Research 5

Hello World

Sorry for being gone so long. The snow has made my internet connection and trying to do research...interesting.

So far since I have not been able to drive anywhere, I have looked more into the questionnaires. I have been so fascinated by them, that I have been looking at them for the last couple days. I should probably move onto other things on the Library of Virginia website. I have seen in passing a collection on propaganda and I want to look into that to see if there is anything about our local counties in South-West Virginia.

I also need to message the Library of Virginia about permission to  use anything Dakota and I find on their website. And I want to message about having microfilm on Virginia newspapers sent to us, once….the school post office opens again. As of right it is closed until further notice.

I also want to go back to Mount Empire one last time to look some more through the cabinet files. Though I am starting to believe that could become a dead end in the long run. But I don’t want to lose hope.

And lastly I wanted to share some of my research. In hopes that it could help others. Because I reflected on that copyright class. I have just posted a link to where I looked up the questionnaires and not a pdf or picture of one of the documents.

The link is on the Library of Virginia Website and all rights go to them and their wonderful historians.

Link–

http://lva1.hosted.exlibrisgroup.com/F/?func=file&file_name=find-b-clas13&local_base=CLAS13&_ga=1.220801563.200964320.1424767345

That’s all that I can think to write about for now. I’ll add more as I find more on the Website.  Until next time.

-Victoria

Present Findings—

Multiple Newspaper Articles. (From UVA-Wise Library microfilm).

Photos of soldiers (From Dickenson County Historical Society)

Photos from Looking Back at Wise County The Early Years

Information from The Heritage of Wise Volume One and Volume Two

Photo of the memorial featured from Dickenson Memorial High School

Booklet about Wise County during World War One

Booklet about Dickenson County during World War One

Pictures of a Bond from 1911

Questionnaires of soldiers from the Library of Virginia

UVA-Wise special collections

Future Research—

More research on Mount Empire and the Wise Historical Society artifacts

Big Stone Gap Public Library

Russell County

Lee County

Washington County

Old Dickenson County Newspapers (Microfilm from Library of Virginia)

Microfilm of the muster roll of Wise County from the Library of Virginia

Microfilm of the muster roll of Dickenson County from the Library of Virginia

Tax documents from Wise county from the time?

 

Another Week

Hi Everyone!

James and I made another trip to the Provincial Archives this Wednesday. We spent most of the time sorting through photos. We actually had quite a few selected but due to the expensive publication prices attached to reproducing those images we were only able to order four. We found some interesting photos of downtown Camrose and the Camrose Lutheran College (Augustana) though!

We are still sifting through the newspaper issues and they continue to be just as entertaining as they were in the beginning of this process. Apparently in the spring of 1918 an oversized egg resulted in the praising of a “patriotic hen” adding to the calls for more poultry and bacon to be produced for the front lines.

Hope all is well with your research!

Summer Roasting

Project Contracts

I don’t really have much of interest to blog about, and I don’t much feel like typing any longer since I spent the last hour and a half typing a draft for the project contract.

So then.  About the only other item I have to report on is the weather from hell we’re currently having.  In fact, my pipes froze last night, so all in all, I’m in a real stellar mood.  Since the weather has been playing havoc on attempts to gather research, my colleague and I pushed back our trip to Pack Library to next Tuesday.

At least we’ve gotten a start on the contract though.  Perhaps I’ll blog again when my water unfreezes and I can wash some dirty laundry.

Tata for now.